Karlovy Vary Film Review: ‘Blossom Valley’

Thrumming with the woozy, hangover energy of a strung-out, sleepless night, “Blossom Valley” may sound like a brand of supermarket rosé, but its spirit, as embodied in its female lead, is a lot more punk than that.

Hungarian debut director László Csuja finds beauty in his bruised, beer-can aesthetic and gives this small-scale, ostensible social-realist story of restlessness and rootlessness a slightly haunted, fairy-tale edge.

It may riff on well-known archetypes — the lovers-on-the-run narrative, the makeshift-family-unit drama, a plotline that is essentially “Raising Arizona” played without the laughs — but this exceptionally well-performed debut is so bravely loyal to its idiosyncratic, misguided characters that it never feels less than fresh.Laci is a developmentally challenged young man whom we first meet as he’s undergoing a series of tests to determine his mental aptitude.

His legal guardian is his uncle, for whom Laci works diligently doing construction and other odd jobs

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